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Clear Communication in Management Using GYR Color Codes

Due to a lack of clarity in communicating and discussing their goals, boards, management, and staff squander much too much time. Setting objectives and maintaining score is a fundamental task that is crucial but is not carried out often or reliably enough. Even when we believe we are communicating effectively, our impression of the impact and clarity of our message frequently exceeds reality. Do the others around you nod understandingly or do they have a dog-in-front-of-the-TV expression?

Try this exercise: find out the top three priorities for the company from two or three board members or staff members. Subsequently, inquire about the most effective measurements or underlying actions to gauge those priorities. Check to see if the answers are consistent, or not. 

How can I perform better?

Prioritizing your work, priorities, and measurements [the content] is the first thing you must do. After that, you have to make a commitment to communicating those things [the form] in the most effective way you can, usually with a powerful visual component. It's easy: Set priorities before visualizing.

  • Prioritize : Clearly identify your top three to five objectives. If it's less than three, you're probably not driving aggressively enough. You are diluting others and yourself if you have more than five. Next, decide which essential actions are needed to reach those objectives AND which measures and benchmarks to use to gauge your progress. Establishing priorities alone is insufficient if there are no clear and accepted benchmarks for measurement, as individuals may have different ideas about what constitutes success.
  • Visualize: Setting priorities, managing tasks, and assessing processes frequently produce outputs that are so complicated that they lose their effectiveness. Paradoxically, the abundance of new instruments for management and measurement may actually exacerbate the situation. Typically, these technologies are designed with the understanding that every user is equally capable and conscientious when it comes to entering, exchanging, and examining data. How frequently do you actually read and consider the "task updates" and "number reports" that you are sent? I therefore depend more on a very simple system: Yellow, Red, Green, or GYR.

I have truly coloured my business environment in red, yellow, and green. Everything is colored in green, yellow, and red, from straightforward task lists and project activity updates to scorecards for financial performance. Typically, these are stored in Excel. I use them as my primary management communication tool since they are so simple to make and comprehend. Few things may be simpler than green, yellow, and red. The easier something is to envision and comprehend, the more likely it is to be used.

GYR task sheets use a straightforward GYR status system, with green denoting good, yellow watch-out, and red alert, to sort the most important data. Of course, you were well aware of that. Our brains have been trained to comprehend what those colors mean.

The ability to truly practice exception-based management is arguably the biggest benefit of GYR management. Humans tend to focus at least as much on the positive aspects of life as the negative, which manifests itself in our tendency to provide managers and teams with unduly detailed updates on our progress. GYR compels you to focus immediately on off-track matters. It's a structure and procedure to recognize the achievements, but to focus the majority of the organization's attention on the tasks that need attention. Additionally, it promotes increased communication and openness inside the company.

These days, there is an abundance of information available to us, but not enough understanding. GYR promotes the discipline of excellent communication, which is the road to understanding and is characterized by simplicity, relevancy, frequency, and transparency. 

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